MAKING TRANSFORMATION VISIBLE AS STUDENTS SERVE TO LEARN AND LEARN TO SERVE

Martha Y Parrott

Abstract


A MODELING PRESENTATION

 

Martha Y. Parrott, Northeastern State University

 

ABSTRACT

 

            The PARC service learning model, applicable to all content areas, provides opportunities to transform learning and positively impact students as they make relevant connections between classroom experiences and their future professions.  As an example of a PARC program model, the Northeastern State University Mathematics Clinic provides teacher candidates PK-12 with an opportunity to apply what they have learned about mathematics and pedagogy through teaching service.  Carefully framed by a research based, service learning philosophy and the PARC model for designing meaningful programs, teacher candidates engage in a weekly teaching opportunity which benefits the community, supports the development of teaching efficacy beliefs, and better prepares teacher candidates for the realities of the classroom.   Clinic teachers engage in every stage of the service learning process.  They are involved in planning and preparation; they take service action by assessing the needs of their students and by developing an individualized instruction plan for the students they will serve one afternoon each week for the duration of the semester.  Reflection is on-going through informal conversations between teachers as they problem solve to find better ways to reach out to their students, through formal Blackboard discussions, and through private and individual journal reflection at the end of every teaching session.   Later in the program experience, teacher candidates become partners in planning the end of semester service-learning celebration which includes not only the opportunity to conduct a parent conference but also a catered reception, a time when clinic teachers individually recognize the accomplishments of their students.  We intentionally bring together NSU students and our community partners to celebrate what we have all learned through service.  From the beginning of the semester until the very end, teachers share stories of their personal transformations as future teachers and credit the service experience for their changed lives. 

 

SELECT REFERENCES

 

Furco, A., & Root, S. (2010).  Research demonstrates the value of service learning.  Kappan, 91 (5), 16-23. 

 

National Commission on Service-Learning (2003).  Learning in deed:  The power of service-learning for America’s schools.   Retrieved from http://ed253jcu.pbworks.com/f/LearningDeedServiceLearning_American+Schools.PDF

 

Parrott, M. (2013). Service learning:  Viable and valuable.  Teaching for Success, 21 (2), 6-8. 

 

Wade, R. C. (Ed.). (1977). Community service-learning: A guide to including service in the public school curriculum. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

 


 

 

For further information, contact the lead presenter:

Martha Y. Parrott

Professor of Mathematics & DaVinci Fellow

College of Science and Health Professions

Northeastern State University

3100 East New Orleans Street

Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74014

Phone: (918) 449-6000   E-Mail: parrott@nsuok.edu


References


SELECT REFERENCES

Furco, A., & Root, S. (2010). Research demonstrates the value of service learning. Kappan, 91 (5), 16-23.

National Commission on Service-Learning (2003). Learning in deed: The power of service-learning for America’s schools. Retrieved from http://ed253jcu.pbworks.com/f/LearningDeedServiceLearning_American+Schools.PDF

Parrott, M. (2013). Service learning: Viable and valuable. Teaching for Success, 21 (2), 6-8.

Wade, R. C. (Ed.). (1977). Community service-learning: A guide to including service in the public school curriculum. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.


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